Tennessee Trails Shelbyville Tennessee

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The Tennessee Trails Sesquicentennial marker dedication at Shelbyville, Tennessee, October 30, 2013, 10:30 A.M., at the Bedford County, TN., Courthouse (south side).  Pictured immediately below is the marker dedicated.

Civil War Trails Marker

The following are some other markers located in Shelbyville.  Below is a Tennessee Backroads Heritage marker from the Willow Mount Cemetery Confederate Section.

Tennessee Trails marker at the Confederate Section of the Willow Mount Cemetery

Marker at the Confederate Section of the Willow Mount Cemetery

There is a three sided marker display, located one block away from the courthouse square, by the old Fly Manufacturing Building & Museum at the corner of South Main and McGrew Streets (across from the Library).

Side 2 or 3 sides

One side of the 3 sided marker next to the Fly Bldg.

Side 3 of 3 sided marker

2nd side of marker display located by the Fly Building

Tennessee Trails 3 sided marker located by the old Fly Manufacturing Bldg. & Museum

Tennessee Trails 3 sided marker located by the old Fly Manufacturing Bldg. & Museum

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Sumner A Cunningham

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Sumner A. Cunningham, founder of the "Confederate Veteran"

Sumner A. Cunningham – The founder of the “Confederate Veteran” magazine. Our Shelbyville, TN. Camp #1620 was named in his honor.

Sumner Archibald Cunningham was born in Bedford County, Tennessee on July 21, 1843. When the war erupted he enlisted in the 41st Tennessee Infantry Regiment. As Fort Donelson fell in 1862, Cunningham was captured and later sent to Camp Morton as a prisoner-of-war. He was exchanged at Vicksburg and returned to his command where he served until the end of the war. After the war he engaged in several businesses including the ownership of the Chattanooga Times, which he edited for two years. In 1883 he edited a magazine in New York entitled Our Day; however, his fame was secured in January, 1893 when the first issue of the Confederate Veteran appeared. In the next forty years, the Veteran became the voice of the South and officially represented the United Confederate Veterans, the United Daughters of the Confederacy, and the Sons of the Confederate Veterans. This article & picture were reprinted from the 1984 Confederate Veteran, written by Ronald T. Clemons, Editor-In-Chief.

TN State Library and Archives October 3, 2012

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The Tennessee State Library and Archives will conducting visits in selected sites this year all over Tennessee.  Representatives from the Tennessee State Library and Archives and the Tennessee State Museum will be in Shelbyville, October 3rd, to record and digitize Civil War memorabilia owned by local residents for a new exhibit.  If you possess anything related to the period of 1861-1865, please come to the old Fly building at the corner of South Main and McGrew St. (across the street from the Argie Cooper Library), on October 3rd (Wednesday), 2012, and there will be members of the Bedford County (Tennessee) Historical Society and the S. A. Cunningham SCV Camp #1620 to expedite the process and assist you.

If you wish to visit their site click on here:  http://www.tn.gov/tsla/

Our website is now linked to the Tennessee Division SCV website, in addition to our previously announced link to the National SCV website.

Polk Arnold

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Who was Polk Arnold?  Les Marsh, our camp Commander has been researching Polk Arnold for some time.  After some controversy has surfaced recently about Polk Arnold, Les has decided to publish his research.  Click on Polk Arnold if you want to know something about a Black Confederate from Shelbyville, Tennessee in Bedford County.  Added note:  Polk Arnold applied for and received a Confederate Pension in 1921.

He who does garrison duty is as much a soldier as he that is in the fighting line” ~Seneca, Roman Philosopher (4 BC – 65 AD)