Tennessee Trails Shelbyville Tennessee

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The Tennessee Trails Sesquicentennial marker dedication at Shelbyville, Tennessee, October 30, 2013, 10:30 A.M., at the Bedford County, TN., Courthouse (south side).  Pictured immediately below is the marker dedicated.

Civil War Trails Marker

The following are some other markers located in Shelbyville.  Below is a Tennessee Backroads Heritage marker from the Willow Mount Cemetery Confederate Section.

Tennessee Trails marker at the Confederate Section of the Willow Mount Cemetery

Marker at the Confederate Section of the Willow Mount Cemetery

There is a three sided marker display, located one block away from the courthouse square, by the old Fly Manufacturing Building & Museum at the corner of South Main and McGrew Streets (across from the Library).

Side 2 or 3 sides

One side of the 3 sided marker next to the Fly Bldg.

Side 3 of 3 sided marker

2nd side of marker display located by the Fly Building

Tennessee Trails 3 sided marker located by the old Fly Manufacturing Bldg. & Museum

Tennessee Trails 3 sided marker located by the old Fly Manufacturing Bldg. & Museum

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Sumner A Cunningham

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Sumner A. Cunningham, founder of the "Confederate Veteran"

Sumner A. Cunningham – The founder of the “Confederate Veteran” magazine. Our Shelbyville, TN. Camp #1620 was named in his honor.

Sumner Archibald Cunningham was born in Bedford County, Tennessee on July 21, 1843. When the war erupted he enlisted in the 41st Tennessee Infantry Regiment. As Fort Donelson fell in 1862, Cunningham was captured and later sent to Camp Morton as a prisoner-of-war. He was exchanged at Vicksburg and returned to his command where he served until the end of the war. After the war he engaged in several businesses including the ownership of the Chattanooga Times, which he edited for two years. In 1883 he edited a magazine in New York entitled Our Day; however, his fame was secured in January, 1893 when the first issue of the Confederate Veteran appeared. In the next forty years, the Veteran became the voice of the South and officially represented the United Confederate Veterans, the United Daughters of the Confederacy, and the Sons of the Confederate Veterans. This article & picture were reprinted from the 1984 Confederate Veteran, written by Ronald T. Clemons, Editor-In-Chief.

In the words of General Patrick Cleburne…

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“Every man should endeavor to understand the meaning of subjugation before it is too late… It means the history of this heroic struggle will be written by the enemy; that our youth will be trained by Northern schoolteachers; will learn from Northern school books their version of the war; will be impressed by the influences of history and education to regard our gallant dead as traitors, and our maimed veterans as fit objects for derision… It is said slavery is all we are fighting for, and if we give it up we give up all. Even if this were true, which we deny, slavery is not all that our enemies are fighting for. It is merely the pretense to establish sectional superiority and a more centralized form of government, and to deprive us of our rights and liberties.” – General Patrick Ronayne Cleburne C.S.A., 2 Jan 1864.
“Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it”-Jorge Agustín Nicolás Ruiz de Santayana y Borrás

As I contemplate the thoughts of General Cleburne, I find myself thinking also of George Santayana’s words. I wonder if the last three and one-half years our country has been suffering a modern ‘Socialist Reconstruction’, quite similar to the one the South suffered approximately 145 years ago.

TN State Library and Archives October 3, 2012

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The Tennessee State Library and Archives will conducting visits in selected sites this year all over Tennessee.  Representatives from the Tennessee State Library and Archives and the Tennessee State Museum will be in Shelbyville, October 3rd, to record and digitize Civil War memorabilia owned by local residents for a new exhibit.  If you possess anything related to the period of 1861-1865, please come to the old Fly building at the corner of South Main and McGrew St. (across the street from the Argie Cooper Library), on October 3rd (Wednesday), 2012, and there will be members of the Bedford County (Tennessee) Historical Society and the S. A. Cunningham SCV Camp #1620 to expedite the process and assist you.

If you wish to visit their site click on here:  http://www.tn.gov/tsla/

Our website is now linked to the Tennessee Division SCV website, in addition to our previously announced link to the National SCV website.

Willow Mount Walking Tour of 30 April

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On 30 Apr 2011 SCV Camp#1620 conducted a historical walking tour in the Willow Mount cemetery.  Dressed mostly in War Between the States (Civil War) period costumes of military and civilians, our camp re-enactors and historians represented a variety persons buried in Willow Mount.

Willow Mount 30 Apr 20111 walking tour

Willow Mount Walking Tour

This tour is planned as a twice a year fund raiser for our camp,  and a fall  tour is expected sometime in late late Sept-early Nov.

Sesquicentennial

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Sesqui = one and one half     centennial = one hundred years

The time is almost upon us.  One hundred and fifty years ago, our divided country was about to embark on a journey that would in 4 years decimate it’s resources, land, and population.  It would take many subsequent wars for over a hundred years in all parts of the globe to equal the loss of life caused by this great tragedy.  Many have written eloquently the many reasons why this needless war begun.  It is now history.  Let us try to tell some of it here, where much of it manifested itself on the fields, in the towns, and cities.

To all who served and died in battle

To those who witnessed and lived to tell

To those who lost a brother or father

To all here on earth who lived the hell

Amen

Sumner Archibald Cunningham

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Sumner A. Cunningham

Our SCV camp is named in honor of S. A. Cunningham.  Who was Sumner Archibald Cunningham?

S. A. Cunningham b-July 21, 1843 in Bedford County, Tennessee   d-Dec 20, 1913 in Nashville, Davidson County, Tennessee-He was buried in Willow Mount Cemetery in Shelbyville, Bedford County, Tennessee.

S. A. Cunningham was the founder, owner, and editor of the Confederate Veteran magazine. It is still being published today, and is considered the “Official Journal of the Sons of Confederate Veterans“.  S. A. Cunningham served in Co. B, 41st Tennessee Infantry (Confederate) and obtained the rank of Sergeant.

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